Tomasz Wagner
Photographer

Explore Another World

Photography by Tomasz Wagner

 

If you’re from Vancouver, you’ve probably heard of Tomasz Wagner through his work as a wedding photographer. Recently however, he’s gaining more and more popularity with his travel photography. I’ve been an avid admirer of his work for some time so when I thought about TRIM’s Jan/Feb theme of Travel, Lists & Dreams, Wagner was the first person in mind. If you are considering a wedding photographer, he is the guy. But if you’re also looking to be whisked away from your daily life and into a traveller’s world, you’re in for a treat. There is very little I can say to add merit to his impressive photographs so without further ado, let the trip planning begin!

Visit his site: http://mananetwork.net

 
 

Poland

Poland

Berlin

Poland
 

 
 

Morocco

Morocco

Morocco

Turkey
 

 
 

Colca Canyon

Colca Canyon

Machu Picchu
 

 
 

Turkey

Turkey

Turkey

Turkey

Turkey
 

Kati
Canvas Toy

Kati Toy

Designed by Kriza Borromeo & Matthew Kim

 

Kati is a customizable toy that can take many forms, accentuating the interior design within your home or office. You may paint or accessorize Kati to further style it into a character. It can also be customized into a collection of families, friends, animals, athletes, superheroes, etc.

This is a collaboration with Matthew Kim for the Vancouver Design Bureau exhibition called Some Assembly Required. New design merchandise are showcased and sold under the theme of “assembly” at the WALRUS Design Store. WALRUS is a design store that features and sells local design items; the Kati Toy is on sale for $30. Come check it out!

 
Kati Toy
 
Kati Toy
 
Kati Toy

 
Kati Toy
 
Kati Toy
 
Kati Toy
 
Kati Toy
 
Kati Toy
 
Kati Toy

Old Filipino Script
Baybayin

Lost Ancient Filipino Script

Designed by Kriza Borromeo

 

This summer, I found myself with some free time. So I decided to take on a personal project that was pretty close to home…I am Filipino, by ethnicity, and yet I’ve sometimes felt distant from the Filipino culture. Taking up this short project helped me learn so many fascinating things about my home country.

This project is centred around the ancient script called Baybayin that was the prevalent writing system of the Filipinos from the 1500’s-1700’s. Although Baybayin is no longer in use, a number of scripts that emerged from it are still in use today by tribes in the Philippines. The script, which some historians argue may have come from the Malays, are beautiful in their curves and dots (introduced in the Spanish colonial era). Baybayin writing was initially carved into bamboo but was eventually written as signatures on paper and even printed.

Below is the script and a brief chronological history of the Baybayin.
More information can be found at Paul Morrow’s website.

 
Baybayin
 
Baybayin
 
Baybayin
 
Baybayin
 
Baybayin
 
Baybayin
 
Baybayin

TRIM x Sarah Clement
Light and Lines

Pursuit of Creativity: A Collab with Sarah Clement

Illustration in collaboration with Sarah Clement

 

You’ve picked your brain a million times in the past few weeks and this time you’re not even trying. Despite half-hearted attempts to create something, you find yourself making more excuses not to and soon enough, your me-time is being filled with mindless internet browsing and — dare I say it? — wine chugging whilst watching Ryan Gosling get topless for the 700th time (it never gets old).

This summer I found myself doing just that. Fresh out of a job and facing the perils of being “let go”, I was simply and utterly de-motivated. I literally lived in my couch and dreamt of seasons past when I left an ideal job position to move back to Vancouver in order to pursue a more adventure-packed, creativity-driven life. Yes, it was a dramatic dream in every form: I was to be a pirate of creativity and sail the tides of challenge in order to find the treasure trove of opportunities in forms of self-directed projects. That was a legit dream–metaphorical, but legit. And yet there I was, eating microwaved pizza in my PJ’s at 3 in the afternoon. I don’t know what happened but I can tell you that my determination factor was down by 70%. I didn’t know what to do, and frankly, I didn’t care. I was digging myself into a hole of self-loathing and sadly, it seemed like I didn’t have the courage to get out.

Luckily for me, before this dark period (the pizza stains still haunt me), I began collaborating with artist/illustrator Sarah Clement. I’ve admired her courage (she moved to Berlin) and work for some time and was glad she agreed to work with me. It was going great, and we were excited over the possibilities of working together. Amidst my struggles, I attempted to keep my pace–albeit often distracted–with the project. It had been a lot of up’s and down’s but I appreciate our joint decision that we complete it.

In retrospect, these images bring pangs of bittersweet sentiment. For that, I like it even more. I like the flawed side of me that I see when I look at it, but also the effectiveness of creative support from a fellow creative.

Sarah Clement x TRIM

Sarah Clement x TRIM

Sarah Clement x TRIM

Sarah Clement x TRIM

Sarah Clement x TRIM

Sarah Clement x TRIM

everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything
Douglas Coupland

everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything

Here in Vancouver

Douglas Coupland is a Canadian gem. At least that’s how I felt after experiencing his exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery, “everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything”. It’s hard to think that this is the first major survey of his works on display. As a visual artist, novelist and designer, Coupland’s work is both expansive and celebrated worldwide. Do yourself a favour and plan an evening out with friends to immerse yourself in his iconic work. Tuesday’s are entrance by donation at the Vancouver Art Gallery. GO!

Side note: I went to the third floor where the Gallery was displaying its recent acquisition to its permanent collection (they acquire around 200 works/yr). A series of drawings caught my attention and I lingered, just staring at its complexities, totally experiencing that “I should have thought of this!” moment. I looked at the artist and it happens to be Gary Lee Nova, my drawing instructor in my first year at the Emily Carr University! Coincidentally, the artwork on display at the VAG offsite is created by Babak Golkar, another instructor I had in my first year at Emily Carr University. To top off this Emily Carr resurgence, Douglas Coupland is also an alumni of the Emily Carr Institute.

More information:
May 31 – Sep 1, 2014
Vancouver Art Gallery
750 Hornby Street

douglas coupland
douglas coupland
douglas coupland

Irving Penn
Photographer

Elegance, Minimalism & Precision

Written by Stacy Thomas
Images by Irving Penn

 

Irving Penn was an American photographer, born in 1917, whose elegant, singular style shaped the direction of fashion and portrait photography in the mid-twentieth century. Placing them before plain, flat backgrounds as no one had before, Penn viewed his subjects from an almost anthropological standpoint. While he is best known for his fashion photography, he was an artist first, and his subjects over the years ranged from iconic celebrities such as Pablo Picasso and Jean Cocteau, to eccentric still life, to fleshy nudes, to ethnographic portraiture. Throughout his expansive career spanning six decades, his pictures maintained a standard of quality that placed him consistently in the upper reaches of his field.Penn’s biography reads like a catalogue—there are no tales of excess or indulgence which typify the high society artist of the time. His story is one of work—which he did prolifically. After spending a year painting in Mexico in 1942, until he was sure he would never be more than a mediocre painter, Penn returned to New York where, through his art school connections, he became the assistant to the art director at Vogue. His first assignment there was to oversee the design of the magazine’s cover art. When staff photographers were unresponsive to his ideas, Penn went into the studio and shot them himself. His first cover, a still life of various fashion accessories, was published on October 1, 1943. He would go on to design and photograph over 150 covers during his legendarily long relationship with the magazine.

Penn’s celebrity portrait and fashion photographs, shot almost exclusively for Vogue, established a classic style which is still emulated by photographers today, and perhaps always will be. They all give singular importance to the subject—the clothes, the model—and project spare elegance, even during the most whimsical eras of 1960s fashion.

Penn was a true artist in that he saw beauty in unusual subjects and was able to translate it into his photographs by acutely highlighting textures and contrasts while maintaining a simplicity of composition. When he turned his focus onto the tribal people of places like New Guinea and Morocco in the 1970s, he posed his subjects with the same tender confidence as with their more contemporary counterparts. The results are strikingly intimate, and would be at home on the pages of National Geographic or in Vogue, where they were published annually.

As his career progressed, his work deviated further from the world of glamour and into high art. He experimented with shooting meticulous, skillfully arranged assortments of things like bones, skulls, cigarette butts and food. In 1949 and 1950 he produced a series of confrontational nude torsos, which he bleached to wash out the flesh tones and give a stark but overtly sexual appearance to the images. These photos were not shown until 1980.

Penn was a masterful technician in the darkroom. Wanting a more permanent print than what the current silver printing method could offer, in the 1960s he taught himself the more time consuming platinum printing method—which involved hand coating sheets of drawing paper with exotic chemicals—and he singlehandedly re-popularized the process, which had been abandoned since the turn of the century. This process produced richer, velvety tones, and he spent the next thirty years painstakingly reprinting most of his older images using this method. He was also a perfectionist in the studio; once assigned to photograph glasses falling from a tray, he insisted upon using Baccarat crystal to maintain the integrity of the shoot. Dozens of the glasses were broken before he was satisfied.

Penn’s photographic legacy combines elegance, minimalism and precision, and an enduring commitment to a style that never wavered in an ever evolving field. His iconic images of celebrity and fashion are a priceless contribution to the archive of his era.